The top 20 most dangerous roads in Tampa (Infographic)

Did you know that Florida is one of the most dangerous places in the country when it comes to deadly crashes involving pedestrians, cyclists, and motor vehicles? A study conducted by Smart Growth America found that Tampa Bay ranked #7 on the Pedestrian Danger Index. Even more concerning is that three roads in Tampa Bay are the deadliest in the entire state.

A report published by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicated that over a ten-year period, from 2007 to 2016, Florida had one of the most significant increases in fatalities and alcohol-impaired driving fatalities. In 2016 alone, more than 3,100 lives were lost because of crashes. Unfortunately, that trend is likely to continue to grow.

“Collisions can be caused by a variety of factors,” says TJ Grimaldi, a Tampa personal injury attorney who works with clients in personal injury, DUI-related and wrongful death cases. “The driver could be distracted by their phone, adjusting the radio, or a pedestrian might have headphones playing loud music and not be aware of their surroundings.”

When you’re driving in your car or walking on the sidewalk, your surroundings and circumstances can change in a second. Every person using the road needs to practice more vigilance and adopt better practices for being safe on our roads. Here is a map of the top 20 most dangerous stretches of roadway in Tampa.

dangerous_roads_tampa

  1. Brandon Boulevard, from Falkenburg Road to Dover Road
  2. Gibsonton Drive, Boyette Road, Interstate 75 to Balm Riverview Road
  3. Hillsborough Avenue, Longboat Boulevard to Florida Avenue
  4. Fletcher Avenue, Armenia Avenue to 50th Street
  5. Dale Mabry Highway, Hillsborough Avenue to Bearss Avenue
  6. Lynn Turner Road, Gunn Highway to Ehrlich Road
  7. Meridian Avenue, Channelside Drive to Twiggs Street
  8. Bruce B. Downs, Fowler Avenue to Bearss Avenue
  9. 50th Street and 56th Street, Martin Luther King Boulevard to Hillsborough Avenue
  10. 15th Street, Fowler Avenue to Fletcher Avenue
  11. Big Bend Road, U.S. 41 to I-75
  12. U.S. 301, Interstate 75 to Adamo Drive
  13. Sheldon Road, Hillsborough Avenue to Waters Avenue
  14. Interstate 4, Interstate 275 to 22nd Street
  15. 56th Street, Sligh Avenue to Busch Boulevard
  16. Interstate 275, Howard Frankland Bridge to Busch Boulevard
  17. Kennedy Boulevard, Dale Mabry Highway to Ashley Drive
  18. 78th Street, Causeway Boulevard to Palm River Road
  19. Mango Road, Martin Luther King Boulevard to U.S. 92
  20. Florida Avenue, Waters Avenue to Linebaugh Avenue

If you have been hurt in a car crash, either as a pedestrian, cyclist, or motorist, contact a personal injury attorney immediately to evaluate your case and make sure your rights are protected. You have a right to be compensated for your injuries, and an attorney can help you fight the insurance companies to get a favorable outcome.

To learn more about what to do if you have been in an accident, contact the law firm of McIntyre Thanasides Bringgold Elliott Grimaldi Guito & Matthews, P.A at 844-511-4800.

Are Self-Driving Cars making the roads safer?

are_self_driving_cars_safeWhat once seemed to only be possible in fiction movies may now become a reality. Self-driving cars no longer seem impossible, with manufacturers striving to develop and design smart systems that protect drivers from crashes and collisions. However, one concern looms on consumer’s minds. Will these cars make roads safer or more hazardous?  If you are involved in car crash with a self-driving car, who is liable?

How safe are autonomous vehicles?

Carmakers hope to make roads safer by eliminating the possibility of a human distracted driver or a person under the influence of alcohol. While data shows the safety of self-driving cars, speculation arises as it concerns human drivers. Google states that autonomous vehicles can analyze and assess scenarios such as when a motorist waves their left hand to move over into another lane, or if another car makes a misjudgment in their driving. However, Google’s car has been the cause of accidents after software incorrectly predicted the right move to make causing the vehicle to crash into a bus.

Car Crashes with Self-Driving Cars: Who is responsible?

No matter how safe Google and Tesla say their cars are, there is still great possibility for accidents because computer software may also fail. According to the Washington Post, a man was killed last year in his Tesla when it failed to stop when it was supposed to in order to let a trailer pass. Google’s self-driving car collided with a van that ran a red light. While self-driving cars may theoretically be safer by reducing the element of human error, there is still the possibility that they may cause harm and result in dangerous driving situations.

If you or someone you know experienced a car crash involving an autonomous vehicle, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact the car crash attorneys at McIntyre Law Firm to learn more about protecting your rights. Call us today at (844) 511-4800.

Car Crashes: Do’s and Don’ts

Car Accident AttorneysThere are approximately 3,287 deaths a day due to car crashes according to the Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT). A preventative measure that you can take as a driver to prevent a car crash from happening is to avoid being a distracted driver. If you need to learn more about Distracted Driving and Florida’s law concerning it, please refer to our article “Think twice about texting and driving” to learn more. In the event of a car crash you should:

  1. Do call 911.

Even if the collision seems minor and no one is hurt, it is important to have proper legal documentation of the incident. Police officers can speed up the process of exchanging information from each party. If someone is hurt however, it is required that you seek medical attention for the injured and stay with person(s) until help arrives. In addition, if someone is injured or damages to vehicle are above $500, Florida law says that law enforcement must be called.

  1. Do give your information to the other party.

It is your responsibility under Florida Statute 316.062 to give your name, address, vehicle registration number and license to anyone involved in the collision and law enforcement. Refusing to give your information is counted as a nonmoving traffic violation. In an instance where you may hit another unoccupied vehicle you must leave your name, address and license plate on a note attached to the car and contact local authorities.

  1. Do call your attorney.

At the scene of a crash your attorney can advise you on information you should collect at the scene such as evidence photos and additional information. Your attorney will also notify you of your rights and additional steps to take concerning injury and/or hospitalization. The attorneys at McIntyre Thanasides Bringgold Elliott Grimaldi & Guito, P.A. can help you. Call us at (844)511-4800 and we can provide you with a course of action.

  1. Don’t leave the scene.

Leaving the scene of a car accident constitutes a second-degree misdemeanor according to Florida Statute 775.082. The consequences include up to 60 days in jail and a fine. Furthermore, under the Aaron Cohen Life Protection Act, a person convicted of leaving the scene of a crash that resulted in death will receive a mandatory four years in prison according to Florida Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FHSMV).

  1. Don’t admit fault.

Unfortunately, you could be charged legally for the words you say at the scene of an accident. Apologizing or admitting fault makes you liable for the situation. Liability makes you responsible for the costs of repairs and medical expenses. In addition, your insurance rate may go up. According to Esurance, the best response to an accident is stating the facts and letting the authorities and insurance agencies determine who is at fault.

  1. Get helpful witness information if you can.

Many times there are witnesses to crashes who are unwilling to stick around long enough for the police to get there and provide their contact information and a witness statement.  Often it is the case that when an officer does arrive, they are dealing with a number of considerations that are unrelated to your crash, and they will not always take the time to speak with every potential witness.  If at all possible, if you identify any witnesses, particularly those that have a similar or supporting view of the cause of the crash to yours, you should encourage these types of witnesses to stick around and speak to the police.  If they are unwilling to do so, you should at least try to secure their contact information (name, address, phone number) for yourself in order to provide it to the police when they arrive and/or your attorney.

Were you in a car crash recently? McIntyre Law Firm wants to help you! Do not hesitate to call us at (844) 511-4800.